Last edited by Mern
Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

1 edition of Control of black rot of pineapples in transit found in the catalog.

Control of black rot of pineapples in transit

C. O. Bratley

Control of black rot of pineapples in transit

by C. O. Bratley

  • 195 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Control,
  • Pineapple,
  • Transportation,
  • Diseases and injuries,
  • Black rot

  • Edition Notes

    Caption title.

    Statementby C.O. Bratley and A.S. Mason
    SeriesCircular / United States Department of Agriculture -- no. 511, Circular (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 511.
    ContributionsMason, A. S. (Arthur Steele), 1890-
    The Physical Object
    Pagination12 p. :
    Number of Pages12
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25516922M
    OCLC/WorldCa16892191

    33 B. Maturity requirements • Pineapples must have reached an appropriate degree of maturity and ripeness in accordance with the variety, and area in which they are grown. • The total soluble solids content of the fruit should be at least 12 0Brix, measured on . Sun, warmth, a little water and regular fertilizer are all it takes to care for a pineapple plant (_Ananas comosus_), both for the ornamental spiky leaves and the fruits. In U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 10 thro you can grow this tropical plant outdoors year-round.

      Pineapples are bromeliads so they take in a lot of moisture and nutrients through the leaves. I've even rooted one with the top slice of fruit still attached. Maybe on the next try, stick the top in soil and then just mist the leaves until you see new top growth to indicate rooting?   Selecting fresh, fully ripe pineapples at the store can be challenging, but knowing a few strategies can make it much easier. Here are 5 simple tips to help you pick the perfect pineapple.

    Penicilium funiculosum has been shown to be the main causal organism of the pineapple fruit diseases called fruitlet core rot (FCR) and leathery pocket (LP). These diseases occur in several producing countries and may result in important losses concerning fresh as well as processed fruits. Black Rot. This is one of the earliest known pineapple diseases. It usually occurs after harvesting. Fruit may be bruised or wounded during picking, packing, storage and transportation. The wounds pave the way for fungal infection. Conditions of high humidity tend to encourage development of black rot. Soft areas of watery rot appear on the fruit.


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Control of black rot of pineapples in transit by C. O. Bratley Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Bratley, C. (Cyril Oliver), Control of black rot of pineapples in transit. Washington, D.C.: U.S.

Dept. Pineapple black rot, also known as butt rot, base rot, or white blister, is a disease caused by Ceratocystis paradoxa (teleomorph) (Thielaviopsis paradoxa: anamorph). paradoxa also causes disease in a variety of other tropical plants such as banana, coconut, and sugarcane making it a somewhat dangerous pathogen.

Pineapple black rot is the most common and well-known post. Pineapple black rot, water blister of pineapple (soft rot), white leaf spot, butt rot.

Scientific Name. Ceratocystis paradoxa; it is also known by its asexual name, Chalara paradoxa or Thielaviopsis paradoxa. Distribution. Worldwide. Wherever pineapples are grown.

Asia, Africa, North, South and Central America, the Caribbean, Europe, Oceania. Black rot is slow to establish and gets worse the longer ripe pineapples are left unused. Dipping the fruit in thiabendazole or benomyl will help slow any development of the disease.

Leaf Rot. Pineapple black rot: Chalara paradoxa = Thielaviopsis paradoxa Ceratocystis paradoxa [teleomorph] Leaf spot Curvularia eragrostidis Cochliobolus eragrostidis [teleomorph] Phytophthora heart rot Phytophthora cinnamomi Phytophthora nicotianae var. parasitica = Phytophthora parasitica.

Root rot Pythium spp. Pythium arrhenomanes. Seedling blight. black-rot or soft-rot. The fungus makes its entry through wounds caused during picking and packing.

Infestation starts at the stalk-end of the fruit, resulting in small, circular, water-soaked spots that are very soft. Gradually, fruit rots and emits foul smell. Control: Dipping of fruits for 5 minutes in Thiabendazole ( ppm) or Benomyl.

Pineapple, Ananas comosus, is an herbaceous biennial or perennial plant in the family Bromeliaceae grown for its edible pineapple plant has a short stout stem and a rosette of sword-shaped leaves with needle-like tips.

The leaves are waxy, have upturned spines on the margins and may be soild green or striped with red, white or cream. BASE (BUTT) ROT. Pathogen. The fungus. Chalara paradoxa. Symptoms Symptoms are seen only on crowns, slips and suckers before or immediately after planting.

A grey to black rot of the soft butt tissue develops, leaving stringy fibers and a cavity at the base of the stem. If affected material is planted, partial decay of the butt. Pineapples are non-climacteric fruits and should be harvested when ready to eat. A minimum soluble solids content of 12% and a maximum acidity of 1% will assure minimum flavor acceptability by most consumers.

Black rot, Botryodiplodia rot, Core rot, Chilling injury, Internal browning, Rhizopus rot, Yeasty rot. Top rot and root rot. These two common fungal diseases can be controlled the same way, though they are caused by different pathogens. Root rot’s only visible sign is a plant that looks like it needs to be watered, with drooping leaves and general signs of distress.

Top rot may eventually show up as dead leaves around the center of the plant. Incidence of black spots in fruits was also, on average, significantly reduced (P = ) by the application of endosulfan 35% EC for fruit mite control; two to five pre- and post-flower induction sprays, at four week intervals from five weeks before, to eleven weeks after flower induction gave reductions of: %, %, % and %.

Black rot disease of Mauritius pineapples was minimal after a 7-day storage period at 28 ± 2°C only when fruits were subjected to a three minute dip at either 4% or 5% AA. Disease symptoms. Pineapples Don't Grow On Trees.

is a fun educational picture book for kids and parents alike. Do you know how and where fruit grows. Control of Black Rot of Pineapples in Transit (Classic Reprint) by Cyril Oliver Bratley. Hardcover | Novem $ C.

paradoxa has been shown to produce symptoms such as black scorch, median, foot or head rot, heart rot and crown decay in date palms (Koltz and Fawcett, ; Chabrolin, ; Streets, ). Al Rokibah et al. () isolated C. paradoxa from rotted roots and leaf rachis of date palm affected with black scorch disease.

They found that. Black rot, also called Thielaviopsis fruit rot, water blis - ter, soft rot, or water rot, is a universal fresh pineapple problem characterized by a soft watery rot (Rohrbach ). Diseased tissue turns dark in the later stages of the disease because of the dark mycelium and spores.

Black rot is caused by the fungus Chalara paradoxa (De Seynes. Pineapples grow in the soil and resemble grey to black rot of the soft butt tissue develops, leaving stringy fibers and a cavity at used to control root and heart rot. Black rot of pineapple, is a post-harvest disease.

It is also known as water blister, soft rot or water rot. Penetration of a fungus inside cells occurs through wounds and stem cutting, causing infect. Pineapples are subject to a variety of diseases, the most serious of which is wilt disease vectored by mealybugs typically found on the surface of pineapples, but possibly in the closed blossom cups.

Other diseases include citrus pink disease, bacterial heart rot, anthracnose, [69] fungal heart rot, root rot, black rot, butt rot, fruitlet. Black rot is a canker disease caused by the fungus (Botryosphaeria obtusa).

When the fungus infects stems or branches, it causes cankers which tend to grow more quickly along the length of the branch, compared to going around the branch. A canker will typically be sunken, have darkened bark, and have small bumps that are the fruiting bodies of.

If 1/4-ripe 'Red Spanish' fruits are kept at temperatures between ° and °F (7°-8°C) while in transit, soft rot will not develop.

Fusarium spp. in the soil are the source of wilt. Black heart is a physiological disorder not visible externally, usually occuring in winter particularly in locations where air flow is inadequate. Heart rot affects the basal leaf tissues and can rot fruit as well, while root rot causes root necrosis that, if left unaddressed, may lead to reduced crop yields and total crop failure.

The infection process and intensity of these diseases depend on variables such as topography, drain - age, rainfall, and soil pH.

In Hawai‘i, pineapple heart. Fungal heart rot. Fungal heart rots ('top rot' in Australia), as well as root rot of pineapple, are diseases associated with wet environmental conditions. P. cinnamomi Rands requires cool conditions and heavy, wet, high-pH soils. Heart-rot mortality can range from .fungicides.

For effective control, the fruit must be dipped in the fungicide within 6 hours after harvest. Black Rot Black rot is the most common and severe postharvest disease of pineapple. It is also referred to as stem end rot, water blister, or soft rot and is characterized by a soft watery rot of the flesh.

Black rot.